skip to primary navigation skip to content
Loading Events
Find Events

Event Views Navigation

Upcoming Events

Events List Navigation

September 2017

Towards a whole brain model of perceptual learning – Dr Aaron Seitz, University of California, Riverside

September 4 @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

A hallmark of modern perceptual learning is the nature to which learning effects are specific to the trained stimuli. Such specificity to orientation, spatial location and even eye of training (Karni and Sagi, 1991), has been used as psychophysical evidence of neural basis of learning. However, recent research shows that learning effects once thought to be specific depend on subtleties of the training procedure (Hung and Seitz, 2014) and that within even a simple training task that there are multiple…

Find out more »

Professor Ryan Adams to confirm – Professor Ryan Adams, Princeton

September 14 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Please complete

Find out more »

Title to be confirmed – Dr James Kirkbride, Reader in Epidemiology in the Division of Psychiatry, University College, London

September 28 @ 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Abstract not available

Find out more »

Title to be confirmed – Dr James Kirkbride, Reader in Epidemiology in the Division of Psychiatry, University College, London

September 28 @ 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Abstract not available

Find out more »
October 2017

Retinal mechanisms of non-image-forming vision – Dr Manuel Spitschan, Oxford University

October 2 @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

The spectral, spatial and temporal properties of the retinal mechanisms underlying circadian phase shifting and acute melatonin suppression by bright light are an important area of investigation. The photopigment melanopsin, expressed in a subset of retinal ganglion cells, rendering them intrinsically photosensitive, is thought to largely mediate these “non-image-forming” effects of light. Using the method of silent substitution, which allows for the targeted stimulation of melanopsin in humans, we have made progress in measuring and understanding the contributions of melanopsin…

Find out more »

Title to be confirmed – Dr John-Paul Taylor, Senior Clincial Lecturer, Institute of Neuroscience, University of Newcastle

October 5 @ 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Abstract not available

Find out more »

Title to be confirmed – Speaker to be confirmed

October 6 @ 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Abstract not available

Find out more »

Title to be confirmed – Jac Davis, University of Cambridge

October 10 @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Abstract not available

Find out more »

The Social Neuroendocrinology of Status – Dr Pranjal Mehta, University College London

October 13 @ 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Abstract: Lay beliefs and traditional theories propose that high levels of testosterone should promote higher status, but empirical evidence is inconsistent. According to the dual-hormone hypothesis (Mehta & Josephs, 2010), testosterone should interact with cortisol -- a hormone released in response to psychological stress -- to influence status-relevant social behaviors. In this talk I provide empirical support for the dual-hormone hypothesis, elucidate the underlying mechanisms, and identify social contextual "triggers". Across multiple studies, higher testosterone was positively related to status-relevant…

Find out more »

Title to be confirmed – Professor Carmine Pariante, Professor of Biological Psychiatry, King’s College, London

October 19 @ 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Abstract not available

Find out more »
+ Export Events