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October 2017

Phase-coupling Resting-State Networks (RSNs) from human intra-cranial recordings comprise functionally related, spatially contiguous regions – Nitin Williams, University of Helsinki

October 23 @ 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Resting-state brain activity exhibits two distinct modes of coupling between brain regions, i.e. coupling between amplitude envelopes and coupling between phases of neuronal oscillations. RSNs (Resting-State Networks) of coupling between amplitude envelopes have been identified with fMRI and MEG, and supposedly reflect sets of regions whose excitability is co-modulated. However, not much is known about RSNs of phase-coupling, which might reflect sets of regions between which communication is regulated. In this study, we identified phase-coupling RSNs from intra-cranial EEG recordings…

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Visual cognition – Marieke Mur (MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit)

October 23 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Abstract not available

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Researching social problems: Putting the cart before the horse? – Dr Apurv Chauhan, University of Brighton

October 24 @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

What do we gain in defining and researching social problems as ‘objective’, ‘quantifiable’, and ‘measurable’ phenomena? In his influential 1971 paper, Herbert Blumer critiqued the social sciences for chasing what is usually taken as the ‘objective’ aspect of social problems. Guided by their objective, quantifiable formulation, we often purport knowing what a social problem is before we begin researching it — in other words, we put the cart before the horse. Using my research on poverty as an example, I…

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Mental health risk and resilience after child adversity – Anne-Laura Van Harmelen (University of Cambridge)

October 25 @ 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Abstract not available

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From the olfactory cocktail party to markerless tracking – Alexander Mathis, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University

October 26 @ 10:00 am - 11:00 am

The olfactory system, like other sensory systems, can detect specific stimuli of interest amidst complex, varying backgrounds. To gain insight into the neural mechanisms underlying this ability, we estimated a model for mixture responses that incorporated nonlinear interactions and trial-to-trial variability and explored potential decoding mechanisms that can mimic mouse performance when given glomerular responses as input. We find that a linear decoder could match mouse performance using just a small subset of the glomeruli. However, when such a decoder…

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Categorical Data Analysis – Peter Watson (MRC CBU)

October 26 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Abstract not available

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Somatosensory cortex is essential for adaptive motor control in mice – Mackenzie Mathis, The Rowland Institute, Harvard University

October 26 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Our motor outputs are constantly re-calibrated to adapt to systematic perturbations. This motor adaptation is thought to depend on the ability to form a memory of a systematic perturbation, often called an internal model. However, the mechanisms underlying the formation, storage, and expression of such models remain unknown. Here, we developed a mouse model to study forelimb adaptation to force field perturbations. We found that temporally precise photoinhibition of somatosensory cortex (S1) applied concurrently with the force field abolished the…

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Suppressing unwanted visual and emotional content of memory: role in mental health – Pierre Gagnepain (U. of Normandie)

October 26 @ 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Abstract not available

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Building a young brain on Old shoulders: A story on the most primitive ventricular brain – Elia Benito-Gutiérrez, Dept. of Zoology, University of Cambridge

October 27 @ 1:15 pm - 1:55 pm

Abstract not available

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An Interference Model of Visual Working Memory – Professor Klaus Oberauer, Department of Psychology, University of Zurich

October 27 @ 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Popular models of visual working memory assume that working memory is limited by a constant resource, which is conceived as either quantized (as in slot models) or infinitely divisible. These models share the assumption that the probability and quality of retrieval depends on the resource assigned to a representation in working memory. I will present an alternative model that incorporates the principles of general theories of memory: Retrieval is cue-based, and performance is limited by interference arising from several sources.…

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