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October 2017

Functional magnetic resonance imaging in cognitive neuroscience – Robert Turner (Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig)

October 9 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Abstract not available

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Adrian Seminar – Dora Angelaki, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas – Dora Angelaki, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas

October 9 @ 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm

Abstract not available

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Title to be confirmed – Jac Davis, University of Cambridge

October 10 @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Abstract not available

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Neural architectures for feature binding and retro-cue effects in visual working memory – Sebastian Scheegans (U. of Cambridge)

October 11 @ 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Abstract not available

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Simple and multiple linear regression – Peter Watson (MRC CBU)

October 12 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Abstract not available

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Perspective taking during communication – Shirley-Ann Rueschemeyer (U. of York)

October 12 @ 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Abstract not available

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Transfer Learning for NLP – Sebastian Ruder, INSIGHT Centre

October 13 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm

Largely driven by Deep Learning, over the course of the last few years, we have become more adept at training our models to map from inputs to outputs with high precision. Our models break down, however, if the task or the data even slightly change and we are still at the beginning of learning how to transfer acquired knowledge. In this talk, I will give an overview of transfer learning and look into its applications and promises for NLP. I…

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The Social Neuroendocrinology of Status – Dr Pranjal Mehta, University College London

October 13 @ 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm

Abstract: Lay beliefs and traditional theories propose that high levels of testosterone should promote higher status, but empirical evidence is inconsistent. According to the dual-hormone hypothesis (Mehta & Josephs, 2010), testosterone should interact with cortisol -- a hormone released in response to psychological stress -- to influence status-relevant social behaviors. In this talk I provide empirical support for the dual-hormone hypothesis, elucidate the underlying mechanisms, and identify social contextual "triggers". Across multiple studies, higher testosterone was positively related to status-relevant…

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Human cognitive neuroscience and how it is taught – Olaf Hauk (MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit)

October 16 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Abstract not available

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Spike timing in motor control – Ilya Nemenman (Emory University)

October 17 @ 11:00 am - 12:00 pm

Last two-three decades have convinced the computational neuroscience community that sensory neurons encode information about the world not just in their firing rate, but also in the precise timing of their action potentials. However, whether this information is used by animals to actually drive behavior has never been shown. In this talk, in a time hopefully substantially shorter than a few decades, I will try to convince you that timing of spikes in multispike patterns, down to about 1 ms,…

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