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February 2018

Intelligence and the frontal lobes – John Duncan (U. of Cambridge, MRC CBU)

February 19 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Nick Mackintosh Seminar Room, Department of Psychology, Downing Site, Cambridge Cambridge, UK

Abstract not available

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Internal Displacement in Cyprus and childhood: The view from genetic social psychology – Dr Charis Psaltis, University of Cyprus, Nicosia

February 20 @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Ground Floor Lecture Theatre, Department of Psychology, Downing Site

From the view of genetic social psychology the aim is to articulate the microgenetic, ontogenetic and sociogenetic processes of social representation (Duveen and Lloyd, 1990; Psaltis, 2015). These concerns changes in the social representations of people as a result of their social interaction with other people, their developmental trajectories and large scale historical changes or changes due to public debate. In my presentation I will discuss the issue of internally displaced Greek Cypriot children from the war of 1974, and…

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Computational Neuroscience Journal Club – Robert Taylor (Bays Lab)

February 20 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Cambridge University Engineering Department, CBL, BE4-38 (http://learning.eng.cam.ac.uk/Public/Directions)

Robert Taylor will cover: • Neural correlates of evidence accumulation during value-based decisions revealed via simultaneous EEG-fMRI • M. Andrea Pisauro, Elsa Fouragnan, Chris Retzler & Marios G. Philiastides • Nature Communications (2017) • https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms15808 Abstract: Current computational accounts posit that, in simple binary choices, humans accumulate evidence in favour of the different alternatives before committing to a decision. Neural correlates of this accumulating activity have been found during perceptual decisions in parietal and prefrontal cortex; however the source of…

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MRI in large animals: a new imaging model – Arsene Ella (U. of Cambridge, MRC CBU)

February 21 @ 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
Lecture Theatre, MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, University of Cambridge, Chaucer Road

Abstract not available

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Gaze and Locomotion in Natural Terrains – Professor M. Hayhoe, University of Texas

February 21 @ 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Kenneth Craik Room, Craik-Marshall Building, Downing Site

Eye movements in the natural world reflect the information needs of the momentary behavior, the associated rewards and costs, and uncertainty about the state of the world. We developed a novel system to record gaze and full-body kinematics while walking in outdoor terrains of varying difficulty and varying informational demands, a situation where little is known about how visual and locomotor systems work together to achieve energetically efficient and stable behavior.

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Using vision to understand dementia in Parkinson’s disease – Dr Rimona Weil, Wellcome Clinical Research Career Development Fellow, Institute of Neurology, University College, London

February 22 @ 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
Seminar Room, Herchel Smith Building, Forvie Site.

Abstract not available

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Title to be confirmed – Dr Rimona Weil, Wellcome Clinical Research Career Development Fellow, Institute of Neurology, University College, London

February 22 @ 12:30 pm - 1:30 pm

Abstract not available

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Finding meaning in English writing – Kathy Rastle (Royal Holloway)

February 22 @ 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Lecture Theatre, MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, University of Cambridge, Chaucer Road

Abstract not available

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A unifying theory of branching morphogenesis – Edouard Hannezo, Institute of Science and Technology, Austria

February 23 @ 1:15 pm - 1:55 pm
Biffen Lecture Theatre, Genetics, Department of

Abstract not available

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: Visual Perception of Materials and their Properties – Prof. Roland W. Fleming, PhD Kurt Koffka Professor of Experimental Psychology, Justus-Leibig University Giessen

February 23 @ 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Ground Floor Lecture Theatre, Department of Psychology

Abstract: Under typical viewing conditions, human observers effortlessly recognize materials and infer their physical, functional and multisensory properties at a glance. Without touching materials, we can usually tell what they would feel like, and we enjoy vivid visual intuitions about how they are likely to respond to external forces, allowing us to predict their behaviour as we interact with them. These achievements are impressive because the retinal image of a material results from extremely complex physical processes (e.g. sub-surface light…

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